The Facts About Bee Pollen Collecting

Bee pollens’ potency and efficacy is highly affected by the process of bee pollen collecting. The most vital part of this whole process is the location where the pollens were collected. Bees are very sensitive to the environment. The slightest chemical change or atmospheric change in their surroundings will greatly affect the pollens they produce.

Almost all countries in the world have high industry rates, chemically maintained farmlands, densely populated by humans, and most of all, heavily polluted. The environment in these countries is not healthy enough for the thriving colonies of bees but they seem to adapt to their damaged habitat. They still continue the bee pollen collecting process under the said circumstances.

Pollens are the male reproductive units of flowering plants which bees gather together with the flowers’ nectars for the colony’s food. As the honeybees fly from flower to flower, their hairy bodies pick up various pollen grains. Flowers benefit a lot from this pollen collecting process of bees because they are able to reproduce successfully. The attached pollens on the bees’ bodies are carefully brushed off by the bee’s legs when they are in flight.

Honeybees add something special to these pollen grains that make them sticky enough to be hammered into the “pollen baskets” of the bees’ hind legs, these pollens are now the ones we know as bee pollens. Honeybees carry these pollens back to the hive. Beekeepers attach pollen catching devices on the entrance of each hive allowing some pollen to drop off from the bees’ legs.

As mentioned, heavily polluted and populated environment affects the pollens produced by the bees. When harvested by beekeepers and processed by manufacturers to be sold in the health food shops or online, a lot of people will surely suffer the harmful effects of the contaminated pollens.

The contamination found in these pollens contains toxic materials, chemical substances, heavy metals, and other impurities caused by the man-made pollution. They are not only contaminated but possess low potency levels as well. This means that the expected healthful benefits from the pollen will not be experienced by users. What they experience is further aggravation of health and may even develop various life threatening ailments. This is very dangerous but the government FDA fails to eliminate this industry wide problem.

Don’t worry we are not facing our doom yet. There is still hope of garnering the many wonderful health benefits of these pollens. That is if we are to purchase the only known pure bee pollen collecting source, the New Zealand pollens. The bees located in New Zealand are free from the harmful effects of a polluted and heavily populated environment. All the mentioned risk factors in other countries are non-existent in New Zealand. The process of the pollen collection by the bees is not affected, thus producing the best pollens in the world.

Now that you know the facts about the bee collection process, you must be well informed enough to purchase only the best bee supplements on the planet, one that can only come from New Zealand.

Group Insurance Health Care and the HIPAA Privacy Rule

HIPAA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. When I hear people talking about HIPAA, they are usually not talking about the original Act. They are talking about the Privacy Rule that was issued as a result of the HIPAA in the form of a Notice of Health Information Practices.

The United States Department of Health & Human Services official Summary of the HIPAA Privacy Rule is 25 pages long, and that is just a summary of the key elements. So as you can imagine, it covers a lot of ground. What I would like to offer you here is a summary of the basics of the Privacy Rule.

When it was enacted in 1996, the Privacy Rule established guidelines for the protection of individuals’s health information. The guidelines are written such that they make sure that an individual’s health records are protected while at the same time allowing needed information to be released in the course of providing health care and protecting the public’s health and well being. In other words, not just anyone can see a person’s health records. But, if you want someone such as a health provider to see your records, you can sign a release giving them access to your records.

So just what is your health information and where does it come from? Your health information is held or transmitted by health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers. These are called covered entities in the wording of the rule.

These guidelines also apply to what are called business associates of any health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers. Business associates are those entities that offer legal, actuarial, accounting, consulting, data aggregation, management, administrative, accreditation, or financial services.

So, what does a typical Privacy Notice include?

  • The type of information collected by your health plan.
  • A description of what your health record/information includes.
  • A summary of your health information rights.
  • The responsibilities of the group health plan.

Let’s look at these one at a time:

Information Collected by Your Health Plan:

The group healthcare plan collects the following types of information in order to provide benefits:

Information that you provide to the plan to enroll in the plan, including personal information such as your address, telephone number, date of birth, and Social Security number.

Plan contributions and account balance information.

The fact that you are or have been enrolled in the plans.

Health-related information received from any of your physicians or other healthcare providers.

Information regarding your health status, including diagnosis and claims payment information.

Changes in plan enrollment (e.g., adding a participant or dropping a participant, adding or dropping a benefit.)

Payment of plan benefits.

Claims adjudication.

Case or medical management.

Other information about you that is necessary for us to provide you with health benefits.

Understanding Your Health Record/Information:

Each time you visit a hospital, physician, or other healthcare provider, a record of your visit is made. Typically, this record contains your symptoms, examination and test results, diagnoses, treatment, and a plan for future care or treatment.

This information, often referred to as your health or medical record, serves as a:

Basis for planning your care and treatment.

Means of communication among the many health professionals who contribute to your care.

Legal document describing the care you received.

Means by which you or a third-party payer can verify that services billed were actually provided.

Tool in educating health professionals.

Source of data for medical research.

Source of information for public health officials charged with improving the health of the nation.

Source of data for facility planning and marketing.

Tool with which the plan sponsor can assess and continually work to improve the benefits offered by the group healthcare plan. Understanding what is in your record and how your health information is used helps you to:

Ensure its accuracy.

Better understand who, what, when, where, and why others may access your health information.

Make more informed decisions when authorizing disclosure to others.

Your Health Information Rights:

Although your health record is the physical property of the plan, the healthcare practitioner, or the facility that compiled it, the information belongs to you. You have the right to:

Request a restriction on otherwise permitted uses and disclosures of your information for treatment, payment, and healthcare operations purposes and disclosures to family members for care purposes.

Obtain a paper copy of this notice of information practices upon request, even if you agreed to receive the notice electronically.

Inspect and obtain a copy of your health records by making a written request to the plan privacy officer.

Amend your health record by making a written request to the plan privacy officer that includes a reason to support the request.

Obtain an accounting of disclosures of your health information made during the previous six years by making a written request to the plan privacy officer.

Request communications of your health information by alternative means or at alternative locations.

Revoke your authorization to use or disclose health information except to the extent that action has already been taken.

Group Health Plan Responsibilities:

The group healthcare plan is required to:

Maintain the privacy of your health information.

Provide you with this notice as to the planâEUR(TM)s legal duties and privacy practices with respect to information that is collected and maintained about you.

Abide by the terms of this notice.

Notify you if the plan is unable to agree to a requested restriction.

Accommodate reasonable requests you may have to communicate health information by alternative means or at alternative locations. The plan will restrict access to personal information about you only to those individuals who need to know that information to manage the plan and its benefits. The plan will maintain physical, electronic, and procedural safeguards that comply with federal regulations to guard your personal information. Under the privacy standards, individuals with access to plan information are required to:

Safeguard and secure the confidential personal financial information and health information as required by law. The plan will only use or disclose your confidential health information without your authorization for purposes of treatment, payment, or healthcare operations. The plan will only disclose your confidential health information to the plan sponsor for plan administration purposes.

Limit the collection, disclosure, and use of participant’s healthcare information to the minimum necessary to administer the plan.

Permit only trained, authorized individuals to have access to confidential information.

Other items that may be addressed include:

Communication with family. Under the plan provisions, the company may disclose to an employee’s family member, guardian, or any other person you identify, health information relevant to that person’s involvement in your obtaining healthcare benefits or payment related to your healthcare benefits.

Notification. The plan may use or disclose information to notify or assist in notifying a family member, personal representative, or another person responsible for your care, your location, general condition, plan benefits, or plan enrollment.

Business associates. There are some services provided to the plan through business associates. Examples include accountants, attorneys, actuaries, medical consultants, and financial consultants, as well as those who provide managed care, quality assurance, claims processing, claims auditing, claims monitoring, rehabilitation, and copy services. When these services are contracted, it may be necessary to disclose your health information to our business associates in order for them to perform the job we have asked them to do. To protect employee’s health information, however, the company will require the business associate to appropriately safeguard this information.

Benefit coordination. The plan may disclose health information to the extent authorized by and to the extent necessary to comply with plan benefit coordination.

Workers compensation. The plan may disclose health information to the extent authorized by and to the extent necessary to comply with laws relating to workers compensation or other similar programs established by law.

Law enforcement. The plan may disclose health information for law enforcement purposes as required by law or in response to a valid subpoena.

Sale of business. If the plan sponsor’s business is being sold, then medical information may be disclosed. The plan reserves the right to change its practices and to make the new provisions effective for all protected health information it maintains. Should the company’s information practices change, it will mail a revised notice to the address supplied by each employee.

The plan will not use or disclose employee’s health information without their authorization, except as described in this notice.

In Summary:

As an employee, you should be aware of your rights and feel confident that your employer is abiding by the guidelines of the Privacy Rule.

As an employer offering group insurance health care benefits, you should make your employees aware of their rights and should give them an avenue to obtain more information or to report a problem.

When you get your health insurance coverage through a broker that specializes in employee benefits, they should provide you with all of the necessary information and Privacy Notice to make sure you comply with the HIPAA guidelines.

Insights Into Predictive Analytics and Population Level Health

In the introduction to the November 2014 issue of HealthLeaders the editor states that “individual hospitals and health systems can analyze their own data sets to find opportunities to save money and provide more effective care for individuals or groups of patients.” I have found in my work with data that there are tremendous opportunities for healthcare providers to greatly improve the lives of patients while using fewer resources through the use of predictive analytics and population level management systems. By examining data from a global or population level and using predictive statistics to identify key performance indicators providers can improve the outcomes for many of their patients.

What are the key processes that can provide such success in providing high value outcomes? I would like to illustrate how a health system can leverage data to improve care. Much can be done with basic databases and advanced statistical analysis. A system does not need to invest in expensive IT solutions to achieve good results, although for larger systems such an investment would be worthwhile, I believe.

The first step is to set goals for the analysis and population level management. It is not enough just to collect data and present it to physicians. The goals should also include action steps. One goal, for example, could be to prevent patients of primary care physicians identified as being prediabetic from progressing to type 2 diabetes. This goal identifies a population-patients with prediabetes-and an action-keeping the patients from advancing to type 2 diabetes.

Goals should focus on preventive activities or strategies. These can be at the primary level, secondary level or tertiary level. Primary preventions strategies try to prevent the occurrence of disease or increasing resistance to disease. An example of this is having as many patients as possible have flu vaccinations. Another is counseling teens to avoid smoking and using alcohol.

Secondary prevention strategies seek to identify indicators or test results in patients that would predict the likelihood of developing a disease. For instance, a provider group could try to identify all patients with hypertension in order to provide services to prevent coronary disease or strokes.

Tertiary prevention strategies seek to prevent more serious outcomes for patients with serious conditions, such as type 2 diabetes. The goal here is help patients manage their condition so as to keep them from needing emergency medical help or from being readmitted to a hospital.

Once a goal(s) is set, a healthcare system needs to collect baseline data for future reference in data analytics. For instance, for systems with a goal of keeping patients with prediabetes from developing type 2 diabetes, data should be collected that indicates what percentage of their prediabetics developed diabetes. One could look at data over a one year period or a shorter time if the patient population of prediabetics is large enough. Another approach to this goal that would generate more useful data would be to track the fasting glucose level of patients with prediabetes. Such data would indicate how variable this measure is in patients, which would be an accurate indicator of how well patients and physicians are reducing the level of this indicator or at least keep it from getting worse.

As data is being collected and analyzed for variability and trends, clinicians along with support staff such as nurse coordinators should determine a variety of prevention strategies that can be employed to improve the outcomes. Administration should be involved in these decisions as their input on the costs of providing such services is important, especially in a value-based reimbursement environment. Strategies can be drawn from best practices research and from insights gained from clinician experience.

It is important that several strategies be employed concurrently in the designed prevention services. From the perspective of data analytics trying one strategy at a time provides much less predictive power than employing several at a time. Analyzing the interaction of several strategies through complex analysis provides much more useful information that can be used to provide better care.

For instance, strategies for the treatment of prediabetics could include having patients test their glucose level every three months, referring the patient to nutrition services if their payer will cover it or if there is a nutritionist on staff, have the patient join the YMCA as the Y has a nationally recognized diabetes prevention program that will work with physicians and providers, and have the patient keep a journal of their diet and exercise. Patients can even be asked to report selections from their journals through a patient portal, as directed by their physician.

After a sufficient data is collected as determined by a data analysis professional, it should be analyzed to determine what progress is being made in achieving the set goals. Using predictive analytics not only can progress be determined but also the most effective strategies or treatments can be identified that lead to the outcomes being measured. For instance, in the prediabetic example it may be determined that the best strategies are having the patient join the YMCA preventive program, report on his/her progress through a patient portal and interact with the nurse coordinator after each of the glucose tests.

Once the predictive analytic results are in the information should be shared with the clinical staff, including physicians. The results should be discussed in a group setting and ways to implement the new findings of the analysis should be discussed. Not all clinicians may be on board to modify the care that they provide but if several are then their progress in providing better care can be shared in future meetings. This will be very useful in motivating other physicians and staff to adopt the recommended changes, especially if the data from the clinicians adopting the recommended changes show success in their prevention work.

The work on providing improved care is not completed after the implementation of strategies shown to be effective by predictive analytics. Data should continue to be collected. Long-term data collection can provide refined strategies that deliver even better results. Plus, research and experience may identify new strategies that can produce even better care outcomes with improved savings for the providers. These new strategies can be implemented and after a period of time data analysis can indicate whether such strategies are effective for the providers. A word of caution, even though research of effective treatment by scientists and providers may show a strategy generally effective, it may not be in a given care setting. The strategy may not match the skill set of the providers, for instance.

In summary, a well-defined program of predictive data analytics and population health management can produce much better outcomes for the patient and the providers. The steps of collecting baseline data, identifying several strategies implemented concurrently, the continuation of data collection, the analysis of the data and the implementation of the best strategies as identified in the analysis should be carefully followed for optimum results. As payers such as Medicare base more of their reimbursement on the achievement of certain population level outcomes it is very important for healthcare systems to adopt the strategies that I have identified.